Human Stamp

About the Collection

// Human Stamp focuses on normalizing the naked human body by using the human body as a giant stamp. I have left impressions of my skin, hair and limbs on various sizes of paper as a simple approach in appreciating the body. Some prints are obvious parts of my body, while other prints are abstract in nature.

The entire collection is created from donated or recycled paper and thrifted frames. The art is minimalist and includes natural and metallic tones. Prints and frames vary, guaranteeing each piece to be one of a kind.

  

Process

Every piece in this collection is original and unique. The process is very simple: I first paint my body and then stamp the form onto different mediums.

This collection is heavy in paper, making unframed pieces lightweight and easy to transport. I have framed my favorite prints and have submerged myself throughout the entire process of framing; I select and purchase each frame, then dissemble, matte and design each piece maintaining my vision.

human stamp

 

Pieces from the Human Stamp series were disassembled in January 2018. 

 

City Guide: Rome

Rome Travel guide and recommendations

There’s something really magical about Rome. It’s incredibly well preserved for an ancient city, putting in perspective how advanced people were in 753 BC. Rome is filled with unexpected surprises, and if you favor architecture and history, Rome is your heaven. Here are some of my favorite places I stumbled upon in this pretty city.

Accommodation

I stayed ten days in Rome in a modern hostel a few blocks from the Colosseum. New Generation Hostel Santa Maria Maggiore is great for solo travelers! Upon check-in I immediately met people cooking in the kitchen. I stayed in a four person dorm. Each room had its own full bathroom and the bunk beds were awesome!

Art

Borghese Gallery and Museum

Cloister of Bramante

National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art

Vatican Museums
I was really lucky when I was traveling around Europe – it was the low season for travelers and I found myself able to walk into major landmarks without a queue. I quickly learned that most museums in Europe prefer you purchase your tickets online and may even suggest a time slot to minimize wait time. The Vatican Museums are no different. I suggest buying your ticket in advance as you may not have the option to purchase a same-day ticket online.

Museum admission grants you access to the gardens, galleries and Vatican. It’s the perfect place to spend a rainy day.

Food + Drink

Akbar
I must admit I loved this place so much I went two nights in a row. The atmosphere is really chill and the food and vino is incredible. When I went on a Thursday night, there was a duet that played covers of songs from all over the world. The mix-matched furniture, candlelight and comfy vibe makes this place great for conversation and a relaxed night out.
Via Piazza in Piscinula, 00153 Roma, Italy

Analemma
Go for their breakfast, stay for the art. Analemma is the perfect place to grab a delicious breakfast and then hit the vintage thrift shops located on the same street.
Via Leonina, 77, 00184 Roma, Italy

Giufà Libreria Caffè
Bookstore + cafe 🙂

Romeow
Rome has joined in on the cat cafe craze (try to say that three times in a row!) and has one of their own: Romeow – Rome’s First Cat Café! Located ~1.5 miles from the Colosseum, you can grab some food surrounded by kitties 🙂
Via Francesco Negri, 15, 00154 Roma, Italy

Ancient Rome

Pyramid of Cestius
En route to Meow I came across the Pyramid of Cestius. Located 2.5 km/1.5 mi from the Colosseum you’ll find the Pyramid of Cestius. Inspired by the Egyptians, the tomb was constructed between 18 and 12 BC for Gaius Cestius.

Before you go check out the Pyramid of Cestius’ website for information regarding opening hours and tours. Booking a tour is mandatory to be granted access to the grounds. Days and hours vary.
Via Raffaele Persichetti, 00153 Roma, Italy

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Roman Forum / Forum of Augustus / Tranjan’s Market

Terme di Caracalla
The advancement of the period is apparent when you visit Italy’s most well preserved ancient Roman thermal spa. It was the second largest bath house in Rome. Use of the large baths and gyms began in AD 216 during the reigns of emperors Septimius Severus and Caracalla. Up to 8000 people daily would use the spa until AD 537- due to Visigoths cutting Rome’s water supply.

As you walk through the remains of this bath house you find games carved into the marble on the edge of the pools and beautiful tiles lining the bottom of the baths. You are even able to go underground, where the Roman’s built a plumbing system to warm the bath water.
Via le delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Roma, Italy

Terme di Caracalla

Churches

Chiesa del Gesù

Pantheon

Additional Places to See

Altar of the Fatherhood

Campidoglio

Ponte Sisto

Porta Alchemica

Spanish Steps